• Fanesca
  • Fanesca
  • Fanesca

EDITORIAL: Lucho Dávila turns the camera towards himself and his heritage in this introspective self-portrait series, which examines archetypal characters representative of Ecuadorian culture in the wake of Spanish colonialism

Photography + Art Direction: Lucho Dávila
Photography + Retouching Assistant: Julia Alexandra
Stylist: Andrew Christian
Special Thanks: El Inca Plebeyo Londres

Lucho Dávila digs into his Spanish and Ecuadorian heritage in this autoethnographic exploration, named after a traditional Easter dish that mixes Spanish religious beliefs with Indigenous tradition in Ecuador. Through hand-made masks and the self portraits of “a mixed heritage mestizo,” Fanesca interprets Ecuadorian traditional characters that appeared after the colonial period. The long black wig that appears throughout is a tribute to the hairstyle indigenous people wear through all their lives.

 

 

I: DIABLO HUMA
A representation of the devil that appeared after the Spanish colony imported religion into Ecuador.
(at left)

II: MAMA NEGRA 
A traditional character that honors the Virgin of Volcanoes and gives way to its mysterious protagonist: a man dressed as a woman with and his face painted black. According to the Ecuadorian Ministry of Tourism, the Mama Negra also celebrates the liberation of the Afro-Ecuadorian community.

III: SACHA RUNA
From post-colonial folklore, this character means “man of the jungle” in Quichua. 

 

IV: CAPARICHE
T
he street sweeper during the Spanish colonial period in Ecuador. A mestizo wore a traditional poncho cleaning streets built by colonizers.

 

 

V: CURIQUINGUE
A celebration of pure syncretism in today’s culture between indigenous and imported beliefs.

  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF HAIR
  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF HAIR
  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF HAIR
  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF HAIR
  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF HAIR